Ending the Affair

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Ending the Affair

An affair can be so edifying, passionate, and you may find the person you are having it with irresistible. But infidelity can also tear your life apart. If you are thinking of switching up, think carefully. Will you be able to trust them? Will they trust you? The one you are cheating with may not have the best long term relationship qualities to begin with. They cheated with you after all, what makes you think they won’t do it again when things get too tough? It’s best to end the affair. But it must be done in the proper manner. Only if you are determined can you put an end to it.

It may be comforting to have a place to go to when your spouse or live-in partner doesn’t understand you or ignores you. But sooner or later they are bound to find out about the affair and blow everything wide open. If your relationship is too far gone and you’ve tried everything you can to fix it, with little success, perhaps it’s time to end that too. Usually, an affair is caused for some reason. The cheater isn’t getting their needs met in the primary relationship. Determine what needs aren’t being met. Is it intimacy, appreciation, or fulfillment? See if you can reinvest in your primary relationship to have your needs met and reconnect. But if not, perhaps consider ditching them both and starting over from scratch. You may be happier in the long run.

Turn to a trusted friend for support. It can be really difficult going through something like this by yourself. Having a shoulder to cry on, a sounding board and someone to give you advice is the thing you need. Instead of focusing on the positive aspects focus on the negative ones. Break off the affair in your head first and start thinking about it as over. Look for the shortcomings and problems with the person you are having the affair with and the affair itself. It’s time to change your mind set about it. If all you want to do is be with that person, even though you know it’s the wrong decision, you have to start having a negative outlook on it. Once your mind has turned from enjoying to reviling the affair it will be easier to sever the ties to that person. Get rid of all the mementos and signs that an affair has occurred. Erase the text messages. Sell the gifts and tokens. Delete the secret file on your computer of you two together.

Have a face-to-face meeting with your lover. Make it someplace public so that they won’t make a scene. Explain to them how much you enjoyed it but that you need to end it and the reasons why. Let them know that you are cutting off all contact. Once you’ve explained yourself get out of there. Avoid getting back into the affair. Remember that just because you’ve changed the affair’s status in your mind doesn’t mean they have. They could call and plead, beg, even use blackmail to force you to see them. Resist or find yourself in the same situation all over again. For more advice read, How to End an Affair: Stop Cheating with Proven Steps to Infidelity Recovery by Eugene Marks.

What’s the Best Way to Breakup with a Hookup?

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What’s the Best Way to Breakup with a Hookup?

Whether you are dating again after a divorce, staving off marriage, are too busy for a serious relationship or believe monogamy is antiquated system with no place in the modern world, you are immersed in the exciting albeit confusing, hookup culture.  And anyone who has spent any amount of time in it comes to a point where they have to break up with someone that they aren’t actually dating. The whole experience can feel like a double edged sword. You didn’t get the benefits of a relationship exactly but you still have to go through the worst part. Some people try to hint around as if they are all-of-a-sudden completely unavailable. But lots of people, of both genders, fail to take the hint. Of course, you may ask what the best way to breakup with a hookup is, but it all comes down to who you both are and how you relate. Do you do normal couple things but are still in the incubator stage of your relationship? Or is this a drunk dial booty call on a Friday night? Just as the punishment should fit the crime, the type of non-relationship you share with this person should determine the way you break up with them.

If you shared meals, hung out in bars or spent a significant amount of time together, this person is owed a face-to-face breakup. Just be honest with them. Sit them down and let them know that you want a plutonic relationship and still want to remain friends. If you aren’t feeling it anymore, say so. When you act like a couple the lines between hookup and relationship tend to blur. You’ll want to clear things up in a way that leaves no room for confusion. If this is the drunk hookup, let them know that it’s been fun but you just want to be friends from here on out. If you really aren’t attached a phone call might suffice, if it’s just a case of text and grind. Then there are those times where you just went out on one date and you are 100% sure the chemistry isn’t there and never will be. Just tell them so. Here perhaps over the phone might be alright as well. If you two have been hanging out a long time, or worse yet were at one time thick as thieves, this is the serious, sit-down breakup.  Perhaps they said or did something that soured you. Maybe you met someone else who flips your switch and lights you up like Las Vegas, or things just coasted into boringsville fast. Whatever the case, you have to sit this person down in a quiet, comfortable setting and explain why. Don’t let it feel like you are stomping on their heart. But they do deserve the truth. If you think they’ll make a scene, do it in a public place like a restaurant or coffee house.

Do go out of your way to let them down gently. Don’t gossip with your friends. Word does get around and then how will you look when it reaches your former hookup? If you are dropping this person, drop them. If you drunk dial them a week later and get it on, you’ll be in the same situation all over again. Erase them from your phone and email. Maybe keep them on your social media pages or else your actions may seem hurtful. Resist the urge of calling them and starting the cycle all over again, or don’t break up with them at all. Don’t dwell on the situation. Learn from this experience and integrate it into your future pursuits. Certainly even the most short-lived relationships can leave you with a good memory. Sometimes it helps to close with that memory and how you’ll cherish it. It leaves both of you feeling good. For more on traversing the harrowing landscape of love read, Sex at First Sight: Understanding the Modern Hookup by Richard E. Simmons III.

Watch how you use Social Media when Divorcing

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Before you badmouth your ex on your social media sites, you might want to double think that impulse. A quick little message that takes seconds to compose might play out differently in the courtroom. Most people when going through their first divorce know little about the legal system and how it interprets messages on social media sites. But what you write on Facebook, Twitter and whatever else can affect divorce proceedings. So make sure you watch how you use social media when divorcing. One important thing to remember is that social media isn’t private. So whatever you post be it written, a photo, anything and on any site can be used against you in court. Blocking your friends or your ex and anyone attached to them isn’t going to change this fact. Aaron Abramowitz an attorney in Los Angeles recently put it this way, “Posting anything on social media is like standing on your front lawn and shouting it.” Blocking your ex isn’t effective. They can just go on someone else’s and take screen shots of what you have posted there, to turn over to their attorney. It’s best to keep what you are feeling private. Lots of people are starting to use social media like therapy. But remember it’s really just a public square.

You may think deleting a post can make a difference, but that isn’t the case at all. In fact, it may make things worse. Deleting a post can be seen as if deleting evidence, according to Caroline Choi a divorce attorney for Lowenstein Brown. She tells her clients instead to keep quite on social media. The reason according to Choi “once it’s out there, it’s out there.” Abramowitz says that “It comes up in child custody cases a lot.” Say a teenage son or daughter has photos of underage drinking or drug use on their Facebook page. The ex’s divorce attorney may make you look like an unfit parent. So it’s key not only to watch what is happening on your social media sites but those of the children as well. You may see a son building a half pipe for his skateboarding hobby. But your ex’s attorney could spin it as allowing dangerous activity to occur at your home. Make sure both you and your children’s pages broadcast only sound parenting. Also check and make sure what you have on your social media reflects what you are saying in court. If you are telling a judge you don’t have enough money to live on but you have photos of your last trip to a resort in the Bahamas, the judge may not believe you. Just remember to be civil, project a wholesome look on your pages, and save your gripes and rants for your friends to share at a bar, on the couch with tea and tissues or around the dinner table with two pints of Ben and Jerry’s. For more advice on getting through your divorce, read Divorce The Drama! by Melissa Sindeband Dragon, Esq.